Black & Yellow Garden Argiope (spider)

Garden Spider 2

photo by Steve Lasher

Just so you know up front: I am NOT (nor ever will be) a spider lover, but when I saw this amazingly colorful spider, I couldn’t help but stare. And marvel at the Creator’s handiwork! The web extends from the top of our hanging planter down to a garden of newly popping golden mums on the ground (about four feet). The male builds his web on the outer part of her web. He fashions a web made of an intricate zig-zag of while silk. Almost looks unreal. They’re called a common orb web spider.

Garden Spider 3

photo by Steve Lasher

Again, did I mention I am NOT a spider fan? Saying that, I’ve walked back and forth numerous times noting her position and movement, taking pictures, and just plain being mesmerized. I discovered (from my Facebook friends) that Black & Yellow Garden Argiope is a good type of spider. They’re harmless to people (that’s comforting to know)  and do a lot of good. Their diet consists of eating large amounts of insect pests like flies, mosquitoes, and aphids. I do not like mosquitoes and flies can be really annoying.

Garden Spider 4

photo by Steve Lasher

To think that our loving God created these intricate creatures. Boggles my mind, doesn’t it yours?

Makes me want to re-read Charlotte’s Web.[1] Remember that classic children’s literature with a pig named Wilbur and his friendship with a barn spider named, Charlotte? Adults and children alike enjoy this tale. Wilbur’s in danger of being slaughtered and made into bacon by the farmer when Charlotte comes to the rescue. She “hatches a plan to save Wilbur’s life.” And it works.

When I think of spiders in those terms, I guess this black & yellow spider is okay. We can co-exist, as long as they keep to their boundaries outdoors.

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[1] By E. B. White, published in 1952

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